Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

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mtngun
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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby mtngun » Sat Oct 02, 2010 12:46 pm

Purlins installed on one side. It's slow going 'cuz I don't want to fall off the roof. :D
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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby mtngun » Wed Oct 06, 2010 7:53 pm

A neighbor loaned me his scaffolding to help with the roofing.
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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby mtngun » Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:14 pm

More purlins and tin.
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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby mtngun » Thu Oct 14, 2010 4:08 pm

All tin on except for ridge cap. Waiting on special roofing shoes for walking on the slippery metal roof.
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Next year the woodshed will get siding, permanent wind bracing to replace the temporary bracing, gutters, and if money permits, a cistern. Probably no more updates in the meantime.

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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby jwp » Fri Oct 15, 2010 10:03 am

mtngun wrote:... and if money permits, a cistern.

Are you planning on building this yourself? If so, it might be worth talking a bit to the people at Ames Research Laboratories (http://www.amesresearch.com/. They have a couple of videos on YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVUmh9uEer4 and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7F3C4MsQwE) that led me to think that you might be able to build a pretty big cistern (several thousand gallons) out of concrete blocks, at least if it was below grade so the soil provided support for the walls. That might be easier than ferrocement, and possibly cheaper, though not coating/lining the inside of a ferrocement one saves a good bit of money.

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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby mtngun » Fri Oct 15, 2010 3:18 pm

JWP, I was tentatively planning to buy a plastic underground cistern. They are expensive -- about $1 per gallon -- but easy to install and there's not much to go wrong

Ferrocement is out of the question up here. Don't think it is available, would be terribly expensive if it is.

I haven't studied a DIY concrete block cistern, but assume it needs a good concrete pad, so that alone would cost as much as a plastic cistern. Yes, everything costs more up here. I can haul up a plastic tank in the back of my pickup, but have to pay through the nose to bring in a concrete truck, and then they usually screw up the mix, anyway.

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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby jwp » Fri Oct 15, 2010 11:39 pm

I was thinking of something around 2500-3000 gallon. Plastic ones of that capacity are pretty big - something like 4 x 8 x 12 feet and a thousand pounds or so. But if you're thinking of one you could haul in your pickup, then it's maybe 25% that size (at least that's as big as *I* would try to haul in a pickup). At that size, the plastic one probably wins, given the effort and cost of transporting stuff to your site, ease of plumbing, etc.

The Ames Research Laboratories "Blue Max" videos are pretty interesting in any case. Their test tank looks to be sitting on a concrete pad and seems to be about 40" x 48" x 30" interior dimensions, which would be around 250 gallons. Their other video shows a test concrete block building that's about 10 x 12 x 10 feet with a flat plywood roof. In both cases, they don't use any mortar, nor do they use any nails in the roof. Only the Blue Max coating is holding everything together (along with making it waterproof), which is the part that really interests me. I may actually have a use for this stuff.

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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby mtngun » Wed Oct 20, 2010 6:15 pm

No lumber for proper siding this year, so it gets slab siding for now. Ugly, but will keep the rain and snow out.
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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby drinks » Fri Nov 05, 2010 8:53 am

I know it is moot now, but did you ever investigate the on line plans for a bandsaw mill using car tires for the wheels and a 4 cycle stationary engine?
Claimed it could be built from used parts for about $200, less than $600 with a new engine.
Either mounted at a home location or mounted on an implement trailer for portable use.
New band saw mills are available for less than $2000.
I built a 1400 sq. ft house in 5 month, by myself, with slab from tie mills and using a thickness planer and a table saw, of course, that was when I was in my 40's.

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Re: Woodshed and Alaskan Mill

Postby mtngun » Fri Nov 05, 2010 10:22 am

Yes, I'd like to build a bandmill someday. It's not cheap, though. Metal alone will run over $1000. Bearings and hardware prolly another $1000. Engine could be a lot depending on whether you salvage a used engine or buy new.

But, I couldn't use a bandmill for this project for legal reasons. You have to haul logs to the bandmill. That means you have to have a legal source of logs, and heavy equipment to move the logs. I have neither.

A chainsaw mill can be carried to the log, rather than carrying the log to the mill. With a little discretion, It flies under the radar of government regulations, providing you have a firewood permit and don't break too many rules.


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